MPLS stands for Multiprotocol Label Switching. MPLS is a routing protocol which provides the ability to create virtual private networks via an overlay network, and it’s widely used in service provider environments because of its high reliability. In order to build a scalable VPN infrastructure with 6WIND Virtual Service Router, you should configure VRF on your 7200 series router or higher.

The “6wind documentation” is a guide to help you build an MPLS network with 6WIND Virtual Service Router.

How to build MPLS network with 6WIND Virtual Service Router

For more than two decades, 6WIND has been a pioneer in the network software business, and today’s network development is focused on defining function virtualization at the service infrastructure. At 6WIND, we’re continuously reimagining how networks of the future will appear.

As the first part of a multi-part blog series, we’ll show how 6WIND’s Virtual Service Router can take advantage of the needs of a light virtual Provider Edge capability. The purpose of these articles is to expose our readers to the 6WIND Virtual Service Router’s virtualized routing operations and how they may be utilized to construct MPLS networks.

1. What is a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network?

MPLS is a telecommunications network routing system that distributes data from one node to the next based on short route labels rather than lengthy network addresses, eliminating complicated lookups in a routing table and accelerating traffic flows. Instead of identifying endpoints, the labels identify virtual connections or pathways (LSP – Label Switched Path) between remote nodes. MPLS may encapsulate packets from a variety of network protocols, thus the moniker “multiprotocol.” T1/E1, ATM, Frame Relay, DSL, and Ethernet are among the access technologies that MPLS supports in its initial designs.

VRF is a technique that enables many instances of a routing table to coexist inside the same virtual router at the same time. A VRF may have one or more logical or physical interfaces, and since VRFs don’t share routes (unless explicit leakage is enabled), packets are only routed across interfaces in the same VRF.

VRFs are the TCP/IP layer 3 equivalents of VLANs. Because the routing instances are autonomous, a VRF may utilize the same or overlapping IP addresses without clashing with other VRFs. Because network pathways may be split without the usage of numerous routers, network functioning is increased.

A Route Distinguisher (RD) distinguishes between one customer’s routes (one VRF for each customer routing table). To identify which VPN a route belongs to, RD is prepended to each route (64-bit identification is prepended) inside a VRF. When exchanging VPN routes with other PE routers, an RD is sent along with the route through MP-BGP.

Route Target is a 64-bit identifier that is used as part of the MP-BGP extended community attribute to determine which routes should be exported or imported to a certain VPN. Route targets may be used to share routes across VRFs, while route distinguishers are used to ensure uniqueness among identical routes in different VRFs. To restrict the import and export of routes, we may use route targets in a VRF.

2. How can 6WIND assist you in establishing your MPLS network?

When it comes to developing cloudified and virtualized infrastructures, Network Virtual Functions is becoming more popular. In this blog, we’ll show how to use the 6WIND Virtual Service Router as a light MPLS virtual Provider Edge network function.

For the sake of simplicity, we’ll demonstrate MPLS Layer3 VRF capabilities on 6WIND’s Virtual Service Router utilizing Ethernet lines and separating our virtual MPLS router into two independent L3VRFs (Cust1 and Cust2), each linking a subset of sites, as shown in the diagram:

How-to-build-MPLS-network-with-6WIND-Virtual-Service-Router

1637929059_979_How-to-build-MPLS-network-with-6WIND-Virtual-Service-Router

The following setup is typical of a 6WIND Virtual Service Router performing label switching functions with MPLS LDP enabled and the underlying IGP Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). To simplify the configuration of MP-BGP neighbors on each of the vPE routers, we’ve enabled route-reflector (RR) functionality on this virtual P Router for this demonstration. A VPNv4 RR should typically be created in an out-of-path deployment architecture for a more complicated setup:

vrf main

routing

mpls

ldp

router-id 10.10.10.10

address-family

ipv4

discovery

10.10.10.10 transport-address

..

Loop0 is an interface.

..

TO-vSER1 interface

..

TO-vSER2 interface

..

TO-vSER3 interface

..

TO-vSER4 interface

..

..

..

..

..

ospf

router-id 10.10.10.10

area 0 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.

Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop

..

bgp

as much as much as much as much as 1000

router-id 10.10.10.10

address-family

ipv4-vpn

..

..

neighbor-group RR-CLIENT

1000 remote-as

Loop0 update-source

address-family

ipv4-vpn

..

true route-reflector-client

..

..

..

10.1.1.1 is a neighbor.

neighbor-group RR-CLIENT

..

10.2.2.2 as a neighbor

neighbor-group RR-CLIENT

..

10.3.3.3 next-door

neighbor-group RR-CLIENT

..

10.4.4.4 as a neighbor

neighbor-group RR-CLIENT

..

..

..

interface

TO-vSER1 physical

pci-b0s4 port

ipv4

10.0.1.10/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

TO-vSER2 physical

pci-b0s5 port

ipv4

10.0.2.10/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

TO-vSER3 physical

pci-b0s6 port

ipv4

10.0.3.10/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

TO-vSER4 physical

pci-b0s7 port

ipv4

10.0.4.10/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

Loop0 loopback

ipv4

10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

..

..

..

..

The following setup is typical of a 6WIND Virtual Service Edge Router operating as a PE router, with OSPF as the underlying IGP, MPLS LDP enabled for label distribution, and MP-BGP for L3VRF distribution and connection utilizing the vpn-ipv4 address-family:

vrf main

routing

mpls

ldp

10.1.1.1 is the IP address of the router.

address-family

ipv4

discovery

10.1.1.1 transport-address

..

Loop0 is an interface.

..

TO-vP-RR interface

..

TO-vSER2 interface

..

TO-vSER3 interface

..

..

..

..

..

ospf

10.1.1.1 is the IP address of the router.

area 0 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.0.0/8 network 10.0.

Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop0 Loop

..

bgp

as 1000

10.1.1.1 is the IP address of the router.

address-family

ipv4-vpn

..

..

10.10.10.10 is a neighbor

1000 remote-as

Loop0 update-source

address-family

ipv4-vpn

..

..

..

..

..

interface

TO-vSER2 physical

pci-b0s5 port

ipv4

10.1.2.1/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

TO-vSER3 physical

pci-b0s4 port

ipv4

10.1.3.1/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

TO-vP-RR physical

pci-b0s7 port

ipv4

10.0.1.1/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

Loop0 loopback

ipv4

10.1.1.1/32 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

Client1 xvrf

main-link-interface

Client1 link-vrf

..

..

Client2 xvrf

main-link-interface

Client2 link-vrf

..

..

..

Client1 vrf

routing

bgp

as 1000

10.1.1.10 is the IP address of the router.

address-family

ipv4-unicast

10.0.0.0/24 is a network.

..

10.1.1.10/32 is a network.

..

reconnect and re-distribute

l3vpn

export

genuine VPN

auto-label

1000:1 route-target

1000:1 route-distinguisher

..

import

genuine VPN

1000:1 route-target

..

..

..

..

..

..

interface

Client1 (physical)

pci-b0s6 port

ipv4

10.0.0.1/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

Loop1 loopback loopback loopback loopback loopback loopback loop

ipv4

10.1.1.10/32 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

main xvrf

Client1 link-interface

main-link-vrf

..

..

..

Client2 vrf

routing

bgp

as 1000

10.1.1.20 is the IP address of the router.

address-family

ipv4-unicast

10.0.0.0/24 is a network.

..

10.1.1.20/32 is a network.

..

reconnect and re-distribute

l3vpn

export

genuine VPN

auto-label

1000:2 route-target

1000:2 route-distinguisher

..

import

genuine VPN

1000:2 route-target

..

..

..

..

..

..

interface

Client2 (physical)

pci-b0s6 port

ipv4

10.0.0.1/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

Loop1 loopback loopback loopback loopback loopback loopback loop

ipv4

10.1.1.20/32 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

main xvrf

Client2 link-interface

main-link-vrf

..

..

..

Performing vrf route leakage with BGP using Cross-VRF (xvrf) interfaces necessitates a precise semantic between VRs and interface names. VR name must adhere to the same standards as interface naming. Actually, the name of the Cross-VRF interface must be the same as the VR to which it is attached. To demonstrate, a Cross-VRF interface called “main” must be developed in VR “Client1” in order to access VR “main” from VR “Client1.” In VR “main,” a Cross-VRF interface called “Client1” must be built. The interface “main” and the interface “Client1” will be linked in this fashion. The naming convention is used for more than just reflecting the interface’s aim. If you wish to profit from route leakage across VRs, Cross-VRF interfaces, and BGP, you must arrange it this way.

VR route leakage is conceivable with the given arrangement. Following that, if BGP peering is established between a CE and each VR instance’s BGP instance, route importing and exporting happens. The routes from Client1 have been imported to the main vrf, as seen in the output below. The @1 indicating that the route entry came from VR Client1 is visible in the VR route leaks.

display bgp vrf Client1 ipv4 vSER1>

The local router ID is 10.1.1.10, and the vrf id is 2.

The default local preference is 100, and the local AS is 1000.

s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, = multipath, n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n

r RIB-failure, I internal R Removed, S Stale

@NNN nexthop’s vrf id, announce-nh-self are the nexthop codes.

I – IGP, e – EGP,? – incomplete origin codes

Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight Path in the Network

* 10.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0 0 32768 * 10.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0 0 32768 * 10.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0

0.0.0.0 0 32768 I 0.0.0.0 0 32768 I 0.0.0.0 0 32768 I

*> [email protected] 0 100 0? 10.0.1.0/24 [email protected] 0 100 0?

* 10.1.1.10/32 0.0.0.0 0 32768 * 10.1.1.10/32 0.0.0.0 0 32768 * 10.1.1.10/32 0.0.0.0

0.0.0.0 0 32768 I 0.0.0.0 0 32768 I 0.0.0.0 0 32768 I

*> [email protected] 0 100 0? 10.1.1.100/32 [email protected] 0 100 0?

*> [email protected] 0 100 0? 10.2.2.20/32 [email protected] 0 100 0?

There were 5 routes and 7 total pathways shown.

display bgp ipv4 vpn vSER2>

The local router ID is 10.2.2.2, and the vrf id is 0 in the BGP table.

The default local preference is 100, and the local AS is 1000.

s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, = multipath, n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n

r RIB-failure, I internal R Removed, S Stale

@NNN nexthop’s vrf id, announce-nh-self are the nexthop codes.

I – IGP, e – EGP,? – incomplete origin codes

Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight Path in the Network

1000:1 Route Distinguisher

*>i10.0.0.0/24 10.1.1.1 0 100 0 i10.0.0.0/24 10.1.1.1 0 100 0 i10.0.0.0/24 10.1.1.1

*> [email protected] 0 32768 10.0.1.0/24 10.0.1.0/24 10.0.1.0/24 10.0.1.0/24 10.0.1.0/24 10.0.1.0/24 1

I 0 32768 I 0 32768 I 0 32768 I 0 32768 I 0 3

*>i10.1.1.10/32 10.1.1.1 0 100 0 i10.1.1.10/32 10.1.1.1 0 100 0 i10.1.1.10/32 10.1.1.1

*>i10.1.1.100/32 10.3.3.3 0 100 0 i10.1.1.100/32 10.3.3.3 0 100 0 i10.1.1.100/32 10.3.3.3

*> 10.2.2.20/32::::::::::::::: 0 32768 0 32768 0 32768 0 32768 0 32768 0 32768 0 3

There were 5 routes and 6 total pathways shown.

vSER2>

We double-check that Client1’s routing tables include the right routes to the nearby site:

vSER1> vrf Client1 show ipv4-routes

K stands for kernel route, C for connected, S for static, and R for RIP.

O – OSPF, I – IS-IS, B – BGP, E – EIGRP, N – NHRP, O – OSPF, I – IS-IS, B – BGP, E – EIGRP, N – NHRP, O – OSPF, I O – OSPF, I – IS-IS, B – BGP, E – EIGRP, N – NHRP, O – OSPF, I

VNC, VNC-Direct, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T A – Babel, D – SHARP, E – EXTREMELY EXTREMELY EXTREMELY EX

PBR, OpenFabric, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, F

> indicates a chosen route, * indicates a FIB route, q indicates a queued route, and r indicates a rejected route.

Client1 of the VRF:

Client1, 00:15:55, is directly linked to 10.0.0.0/24.

B>* 10.0.1.0/24 [200/0], main, label 82/80, 00:15:06 is directly linked.

00:15:06 through 10.2.2.2(vrf main) (recursive), label 80

* 00:15:06 through 10.1.2.2, TO-vSER2(vrf main), label implicit-null/80, TO-vSER2(vrf main)

Loop1, 00:16:06 C>* 10.1.1.10/32 is directly linked

B>* 10.1.1.100/32 [200/0], main, label 81/80, 00:15:07 is directly linked.

00:15:07 through 10.3.3.3(vrf main) (recursive), label 80

* 00:15:07 through 10.1.3.3, TO-vSER3(vrf main), label implicit-null/80, TO-vSER3(vrf main)

B>* 10.2.2.20/32 [200/0], main, label 82/80, 00:15:06 is directly linked.

00:15:06 through 10.2.2.2(vrf main) (recursive), label 80

* 00:15:06 through 10.1.2.2, TO-vSER2(vrf main), label implicit-null/80, TO-vSER2(vrf main)

vSER2> vrf Client1 show ipv4-routes

K stands for kernel route, C for connected, S for static, and R for RIP.

O – OSPF, I – IS-IS, B – BGP, E – EIGRP, N – NHRP,

VNC, VNC-Direct, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T A – Babel, D – SHARP, E – EXTREMELY EXTREMELY EXTREMELY EX

PBR, OpenFabric, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, FBR, F

> indicates a chosen route, * indicates a FIB route, q indicates a queued route, and r indicates a rejected route.

Client1 of the VRF:

B>* 10.0.0.0/24 [200/0], main, label 81/80, 02:02:44 is directly linked.

via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive), label 80, 02:02:44 via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive) via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive) via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive

* through 10.1.2.1, label implicit-null/80, 02:02:44, TO-vSER1(vrf main),

Client1, 02:03:31 is directly linked to 10.0.1.0/24.

B>* 10.1.1.10/32 [200/0], main, label 81/80, 02:02:44 is directly linked.

via 10.1.1.1(vrf main) (recursive), label 80, 02:02:44

* through 10.1.2.1, label implicit-null/80, 02:02:44, TO-vSER1(vrf main),

B>* 10.1.1.100/32 [200/0], main, label 83/80, 02:02:37 is directly linked.

Label 80, 02:02:37, through 10.3.3.3(vrf main) (recursive), via 10.3.3.3(vrf main) (recursive), via 10.3.3.3(vrf main) (recursive

* through 10.0.2.10, TO-vP-RR(vrf main), label 21/80, 02:02:37; via 10.0.2.10, TO-vP-RR(vrf main); via 10.0.2.10, TO-vP-RR(vrf main

* via 10.1.2.1, TO-vSER1(vrf main), label 21/80, 02:02:37; through 10.1.2.1, TO-vSER1(vrf main), label 21/80, 02:02:37; via 10.1.2.1,

* via 10.2.4.4, TO-vSER4(vrf main), label 23/80, 02:02:37; through 10.2.4.4, TO-vSER4(vrf main), label 23/80, 02:02:37; via 10.2.4.4, TO

C>* Loop2, 02:03:43 is directly linked to 10.2.2.20/32.

A brief examination of the mpls forwarding tables and LDP bindings reveals the labels assigned to interfaces and prefixes:

display mpls table vSER1>

Nexthop inbound label type Labeling that goes outward

————————————————

10 LDP implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-n

16 LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-

10 LDP implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-n

17 LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null-null-null-null-null-nul

10 LDP implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-n

LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null 19 LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null

20 LDP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null-null-null-null-null-nul

LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-n

22 LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null LDP 10.1.3.3 implicit-

LDP 10.0.1.10 LDP 10.0.1.10 LDP 10.0.1.10 LDP 10.0.1.

LDP 10.1.3.3 (LDP 10.1.3.3) (LDP 10.1.3.3) (

LDP 10.1.2.2 LDP 10.1.2.2 LDP 10.1.2.2 LDP 10.1.

LDP 10.0.1.10 implicit-null 24 LDP 10.0.1.10 implicit-null

BGP Client1 – 80 BGP Client1 – 80 BGP Client1 – 80

81 BGP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null BGP 10.1.3.3 implicit-null BGP 10.1.3.3 implicit-n

82 BGP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null BGP 10.1.2.2 implicit-null BGP 10.1.2.2 implicit-n

display mpls ldp binding vSER1>

In Use AF Destination Nexthop Local Label Remote Label AF Destination Nexthop

ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0

10.3.3.3 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ip

10.0.1.0/24 ipv4 imp-null imp-null no 10.10.10.10 imp-null no

10.0.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 16 imp-null ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 16 yes

10.0.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 16 19 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 16 19 no

10.0.2.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

10.0.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 17 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 17 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.

10.0.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 17 imp-null ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 17 yes

10.0.3.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

10.2.2.2 18 16 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24

10.3.3.3 18 20 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24

10.0.4.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

10.2.2.2 imp-null 21 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ip

ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.3.3.3 imp-null 17 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.3.3.3 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.3.

10.1.1.1/32 ipv4 imp-null 16 no 10.10.10.10 imp-null 16 no 10.10.10.10 imp-null 16 no

imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null no ipv4

ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.1

10.1.2.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.1.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 22 no ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 22 no ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.

10.1.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null no

10.1.3.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

imp 10.2.2.2/32 ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 -null yes -null yes -null yes

10.2.2.2/32 10.3.3.3 19 21 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.3.3.3 19 21 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.3.

10.2.2.2/32 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.2.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 20 imp ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I -null yes

10.2.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 20 22 no 10.2.4.0/24 ipv4 10.3.3.3 20 22 no ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.3.

10.2.4.0/24 ipv4 ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten ten twenty

10.3.3.3/32 10.2.2.2 21 23 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.

10.3.3.3/32 ipv4 imp. 10.3.3.3 -null yes

10.3.3.3/32 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.3.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 22 17 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 22 17 no

10.3.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 22 imp ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 22 imp ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.3. -null yes

10.3.4.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.4.4.4/32 10.2.2.2 23 18 yes ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.2.2.2 23 18 yes

10.4.4.4/32 10.3.3.3 23 23 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I yes

10.4.4.4/32 ipv4 Yeah, 10.10.10.10 23 23 yes, 10.10.10.10 23 23 yes, 10.10.10.

10.10.10.10/32 10.2.2.2 24 24 no ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10.2.2.2 24 24 no

ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10.3.3.3 24 no 10.3.3.3 24 no 10.3.3.3 24 no 10.3.3.3 24

ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

display mpls table vSER2>

Nexthop inbound label type Labeling that goes outward

————————————————

10 LDP implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-n

LDP 10.2.4.4 implicit-null 16 LDP 10.2.4.4 implicit-null

LDP implicit-null 10.2.4.4

LDP 10.2.4.4 implicit-null 18 LDP 10.2.4.4 implicit-null

LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null 19 LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null

LDP 10.0.2.10 implicit-null 19 LDP 10.0.2.10 implicit-null

implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit-null implicit

LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-n

22 LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null LDP 10.1.2.1 implicit-

LDP 10.1.2.1 (LDP 10.1.2.1) (LDP 10.1.2.1) (

LDP 10.0.2.10 19 LDP 10.0.2.10

LDP 10.2.4.4 LDP 10.2.4.4 LDP 10.2.4.4 LDP 10.2.4.4 L

LDP 10.0.2.10 implicit-null 24 LDP 10.0.2.10 implicit-null

BGP Client1 – 80 BGP Client1 – 80 BGP Client1 – 80

16 BGP 10.0.2.81 81 BGP 10.0.2.10 81 BGP 10.0.2.10 81

82 BGP 10.0.2.10 19 BGP 10.0.2.10

83 BGP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null BGP 10.1.2.1 implicit-null BGP 10.1.2.1 implicit-n

display mpls ldp binding vSER2>

In Use AF Destination Nexthop Local Label Remote Label AF Destination Nexthop

ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.1.1.1 19 imp-null ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.1.1.1 19 imp-null ipv4 10.0 yes

10.4.4.4 19 19 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24

10.0.1.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2

imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4

10.0.2.0/24 ipv4 imp-null imp-null no 10.10.10.10 imp-null no

10.0.3.0/24 10.1.1.1 20 17 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.1.1.1 20 17 no

10.0.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 20 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 20 20 no

10.0.3.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 16 18 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 16 18 no ipv4 10.0

10.4.4.4 16 imp-null ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 ipv4 yes

10.0.4.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10 yes

10.1.1.1/32 10.1.1.1 21 imp ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.1.1.1 21 imp ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 -null yes

10.4.4.4 21 21 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32

10.1.1.1/32 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.1.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null no

ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 17 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 17 no ipv4 10.1

10.1.2.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

10.1.1.1 22 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 -null yes

10.1.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 22 22 no ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 22 22 no

10.1.3.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.1.1.1 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.1.1.1 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.2.2

ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.4.4.4 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.4.4.4 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.2.2

10.2.2.2/32 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

ipv4 10.2.4.0/24

imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null imp-null

10.2.4.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 10.1.1.1 23 21 yes ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 10.1.1.1 23 21 yes ipv4 10.3.3

10.3.3.3/32 10.4.4.4 23 23 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I yes

10.3.3.3/32 ipv4 Yes, 10.10.10.10 23.19, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes

10.3.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 17 22 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 17 22 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.1

10.3.4.0/24 10.4.4.4 17 imp ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I -null yes

10.3.4.0/24 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.1.1.1 18 23 no ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.1.1.1 18 23 no ipv4 10.4.

10.4.4.4/32 ipv4 18 imp 10.4.4.4 -null yes

10.4.4.4/32 ipv4 No. 10.10.10.10 18 23 no. 10.10.10.10 18 23 no.

10.10.10.10/32 10.1.1.1 24 24 no ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10.1.1.1 24 24 no

10.10.10.10/32 ipv4 10.4.4.4 24 no 10.4.4.4 24 no 10.4.4.4 24 no 10.4.4.4 24

10.10.10.10/32 ipv4 10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10:10

In Use AF Destination Nexthop Local Label Remote Label AF Destination Nexthop

ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24

ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0

10.3.3.3 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 no ip

ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0.1.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0

ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2

10.0.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null no

10.0.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null 19 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.

imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4 ipv4 10.0.2.0/24 10.4.4.4

ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 17 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 17 no ipv4 10.0.3

10.0.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.

10.0.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 imp-null no

10.0.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null 20 no ipv4 10.0.3.0/24 10.

ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 imp-null 18 no ipv4 10.0

ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 imp-null 16 no ipv4 10.0

10.3.3.3 imp-null 20 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 no ip

10.4.4.4 imp-null imp-null no ipv4 10.0.4.0/24 10.4.4.4 imp-null no

10.1.1.1/32 10.1.1.1 16 imp ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.1.1.1 16 imp ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 -null yes

10.1.1.1/32 10.2.2.2 16 21 yes ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.2.2.2 16 21 yes ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 10.

10.3.3.3 16 17 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32

10.4.4.4 16 21 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32 no ipv4 10.1.1.1/32

10.1.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 17 imp-null ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.1.1 yes

10.2.2.2 17 imp 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.0 -null yes

10.3.3.3 17 18 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24

10.4.4.4 17 17 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24 no ipv4 10.1.2.0/24

10.1.1.1 18 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 -null yes

10.1.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 18 22 yes ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.2.2.2 18 22 yes ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.

10.1.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 18 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.3.3.3 18 imp ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10. -null yes

10.1.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 18 22 no ipv4 10.1.3.0/24 10.4.4.4 18 22 no

10.2.2.2/32 10.1.1.1 21 19 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.1.1.1 21 19 no

10.2.2.2/32 10.2.2.2 21 imp ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I -null yes -null yes -null yes

10.2.2.2/32 10.3.3.3 21 21 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.3.3.3 21 21 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.3.

10.2.2.2/32 10.4.4.4 21 18 no ipv4 10.2.2.2/32 10.4.4.4 21 18 no

10.2.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 22 20 no ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 22 20 no ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.1

10.2.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 22 imp ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 22 imp ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.2. -null yes

10.2.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 22 22 no ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 22 22 no

10.2.4.0/24 10.4.4.4 22 imp ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.4.4.4 22 imp ipv4 10.2.4.0/24 10.4. -null yes

ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 10.1.1.1 19 21 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 10.1.1.1 19 21 no ipv4 10.3.3

10.3.3.3/32 10.2.2.2 19 23 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.

10.3.3.3/32 ipv4 imp. 10.3.3.3 -null yes

10.3.3.3/32 10.4.4.4 19 23 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.3.3.3/32 no ipv4 10.

10.3.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 20 22 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.1.1.1 20 22 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.1

10.3.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 20 17 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.2.2.2 20 17 no ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.2.

10.3.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 20 imp ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.3.3.3 20 imp ipv4 10.3.4.0/24 10.3. -null yes

10.3.4.0/24 10.4.4.4 20 imp ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 ipv4 I -null yes

10.4.4.4/32 10.1.1.1 23 23 no ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.1.1.1 23 23 no

10.4.4.4/32 10.2.2.2 23 18 no ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.2.2.2 23 18 no

10.4.4.4/32 10.3.3.3 23 23 no ipv4 10.4.4.4/32 10.3.3.3 23 23 no

10.4.4.4/32 ipv4 23 imp 10.4.4.4 -null yes

10.10.10.10/32 ipv4 24 no 10.1.1.1 imp-null 10.1.1.1 imp-null 10.1.1.1 imp-null

10.10.10.10/32 ipv4 10.2.2.2 imp-null 24 no 10.2.2.2 imp-null 24 no 10.2.2.2 imp-nul

ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10.3.3.3 imp-null 24 no 10.3.3.3 imp-null 24 no 10.3.3.3 imp-nul

ipv4 10.10.10.10/32 10.4.4.4 imp-null 24 no 10.4.4.4 imp-null 24 no 10.4.4.4 imp-nul

The virtual CE router we utilized in our setup had the following settings. The routing between the vCE and the vPE might be static, OSPF, or eBGP.

CE1> nodefault display config

administration of vrf

interface

management of the physical

pci-b0s3 port

ipv4

dhcp

..

..

..

..

dns

8.8.8.8 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

vrf main

routing

static

ipv4-route 0.0.0.0/0

10.0.0.1 is the next jump.

..

..

..

interface

MPLS1 (Physical)

pci-b0s4 port

ipv4

10.0.0.10/24 is the IP address of the server.

..

..

..

..

system

CE1 is the name of the host.

license

online

serial

administration of vrf

..

..

.. To evaluate our setup’s end-to-end capability, we’ll send a typical ping between the end client and record traffic on outgoing interfaces to check the label advertisements:

command traffic-capture TO-vP-RR vSER2 starting config#

14:42:08.316163 ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: 0c:6c:ef:04:00:04 > 0c:6f:02:17:00:02, ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: (label 16, exp 0, ttl 63) MPLS (label 16, exp 0, ttl 63) (label 80, exp 0, [S], ttl 64) 10.0.0.10 vs. 10.0.1.1: Id 6044, seq 45, length 64, ICMP echo reply

command traffic-capture TO-vP-RR vSER1>

14:43:55.661653 0c:bb:4a:bd:00:04 > 0c:6f:02:17:00:01, ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: MPLS (label 21, exp 0, ttl 62), ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: MPLS (label 21, exp 0, ttl 62) (label 80, exp 0, [S], ttl 63) ICMP echo request, id 6141, seq 1, length 64, 10.0.0.10 > 10.0.1.1

14:43:55.662706 0c:6f:02:17:00:01 > 0c:bb:4a:bd:00:04, ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: MPLS (label 21, exp 0, ttl 62), ethertype MPLS unicast (0x8847), length 106: MPLS (label 21, exp 0, ttl 62) (label 80, exp 0, [S], ttl 64) 10.0.0.10 vs. 10.0.1.1: Id 6141, seq 1, length 64, ICMP echo reply

In the preceding example, we can observe that BGP assigned label 80 to VRF Client1, and LDP set transport labels from vSER1 and vSER2 to 21 and 16, respectively, as seen in the display mpls table output.

This brings us to the end of our first blog regarding the 6WIND Virtual Service Router’s MPLS L3VPN capabilities.

In the next installment of this series, we’ll go through more MPLS L3VPN deployment scenarios and how our technology can assist you shift from conventional hardware vendor lock-in to a virtualized and open deployment paradigm.

We’d be delighted to hear from you if you have any questions about this position, and we’d be delighted to talk more about your present and future needs: [email protected]

Watch This Video-

The “6windgate” is a virtual service router that allows users to build MPLS networks. It can be used to configure and manage routing protocols such as BGP, OSPF, and ISIS.

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